The Couple's Table

Things We've Noticed About YouTube Lately

March 14, 2024 Heather & Tom Season 1 Episode 130
Things We've Noticed About YouTube Lately
The Couple's Table
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

We've each had some recent creator experiences that have shifted some thoughts about creating on YouTube in 2024 (but don't worry, they're all good things!).

🟣 CONNECT WITH HEATHER —
My Vlog Channel: http://www.youtube.com/heatherjustcreate
My Tutorial Channel: http://www.youtube.com/heatherramirez
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/heatherjustc...
Website: http://www.heatherjustcreate.com

🟣 CONNECT WITH TOM —
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/tombuck 
Instagram: @sodarntom

Speaker 1:

CYBERK 하고. Hello and welcome. My name is Tom and I'm Heather, and you're sitting at the one and only couples table.

Speaker 2:

The couples table is a live show podcast here on the channel. Join us for better or worse.

Speaker 1:

For richer and poorer.

Speaker 2:

In sickness and in health.

Speaker 1:

Whenever we stream, even if it's two hours earlier than normal.

Speaker 2:

Yay, why is it two hours earlier than normal, tom?

Speaker 1:

I'm going to go play hockey later.

Speaker 2:

He's got a hockey game.

Speaker 1:

So we gotta move in. So thanks for accommodating me as I'm blocking shots. I'll be thankful to each and every one of you.

Speaker 2:

Yes, you'll be doing this while we're supposed to stream. Anyway, hello everybody. Hi to Sammy Superstar, thanks for being on the YouTube huddle up. It was good to see you, rock. Just want to say from the get go, you guys are really inspiring for a new YouTube creator like me. I love that you can do this together. I've learned a lot from both.

Speaker 1:

So nice, that's a day maker comment right there.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, what a wonderful thing to read. I'm so glad Audio hotlines in the house.

Speaker 1:

Hello.

Speaker 2:

Happy Friday. Happy Friday, everyone Says Rock Pete Breen is here. Hello, hello, homestick Mac. Hi, everyone Call me Cubby Friday and Jules. Hello, it's good to see. It's cool, because now I see a lot of these people twice.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's awesome Because of the YouTube huddle up, which has been so much fun. That is really fun.

Speaker 2:

I'm going to talk about that a little bit today, but today we're so the topic. Why'd you laugh?

Speaker 1:

I saw you go wide and then narrow it down.

Speaker 2:

We can talk about that. Today I had a second cup of coffee. Okay, that's good. My mind.

Speaker 1:

Well, today, if you've noticed.

Speaker 2:

What did we notice?

Speaker 1:

That's what we're talking about Things you've noticed on YouTube today. So your YouTube huddle up fits perfectly within that. The purview of those constraints we both bad. Just this is not a bad thing. It's not like a YouTube drama thing, it's just sort of like oh cool, interesting things have happened.

Speaker 2:

It can be.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, cool, interesting things have happened on our channels lately.

Speaker 2:

Just like things worth noting.

Speaker 1:

Things worth noting. Yeah, where else are we going to talk about them? You know, yeah, I mean it's rocky, and if I had that mic screen I would be tempted to take a bite out of it this one, and we got Mr Camerajunkey and Kim Bocha.

Speaker 2:

What's up? Good to see you guys.

Speaker 1:

The.

Speaker 2:

Boach. Well, why don't you start, because you have visual? I mean, I have visual too, oh yeah.

Speaker 1:

I have a couple of different things to cover today, but one thing that was just sort of interesting, which we talk about all the time. You did a live stream on Wednesday.

Speaker 2:

I did two. You did two live streams in one day. This is my third. Yeah, two live streams in a day.

Speaker 1:

Oh no, sorry, your live stream was on Tuesday. This is your third one of the week. Heather did a live stream on Tuesday with her friend James, who has a YouTube channel and also an Instagram, and it was a great stream where they were talking about sort of his approach to short form content on Instagram, because he's an expert in it in a way that we are not, and it was so interesting to hear about. One of the things that we're talking about in that was sort of the difference between the platforms, and this is obviously something that comes up a lot, and one of the differences in something like Instagram or TikTok is how brief the stuff you make sticks around Shelf life the shelf life of your content versus YouTube. One of the biggest strengths that we've said for many years is that YouTube the stuff you post on there is always there and accessible. How many times in your recommendations or your search results do you get videos that are years old, like you know?

Speaker 2:

Well, also that and like when you try to find a post on Instagram that you saw, you know like. I mean, I feel like this happened so often. It's a meme now, but if I want to show a post to Tom that I see on Instagram by the, time I take the phone to Tom, it's just.

Speaker 1:

We will never find it again.

Speaker 2:

Find it, but every time I log into YouTube videos are given a second try, sometimes a third.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, the thumbnail will pop up against like come on, I know you're going to want this one.

Speaker 2:

You know, based on what we know, you really want to watch this video here.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and sometimes I know we're actually hurting that person's CTR by not looking on the video every time it's shown, but sometimes, like the 10th time, the thumbnail pops up.

Speaker 2:

I'm like okay.

Speaker 1:

And so many times we have the discussion where one of us will say, oh, I watched a video about whatever, and the other will say I didn't see the video. I didn't see the video, or no, like I didn't see the video but I've been seeing the thumbnail. And then you'll tell me and that'll make me finally click on that thumbnail or whatever it might be, yeah, something had happened. So last summer I made what is one of my favorite videos I've ever made. It was when I was sort of like switching up how I was doing things on my channel.

Speaker 1:

I spent, I think, in total about six weeks on this video, very different than, you know, the two or three days I normally spent on a video and it was about an old video camera, the Canon XL one like an old camcorder from 25 years ago. That was kind of my dream camera as a kid. And about three years ago oh my god, yeah, I think three years ago this year I found one on eBay that was in like awesome condition and for a couple hundred bucks and bought it and I wanted to make a video about it for like three years and I didn't until last summer and I love that video. I put so much effort into that video but the video didn't do particularly well, I mean, it took you forever to make this video.

Speaker 1:

It took me forever. I mean, it was one of those ones that like it was a labor of love. But you know, sometimes the videos that's the one, sometimes the videos that you work the hardest on and care about the most are the lowest performance. It was a 10 out of 10. It's always the case.

Speaker 2:

It's the one that you put the most time in. For some reason, it's the one that just doesn't, you know.

Speaker 1:

I did the thing where I changed the thumbnail like 10 times, I changed the title a couple of times and finally after I even put it on my website. I think even now, if you go to the bottom of the website there's like here's a couple of videos to recommend and it's like one of those. So it's like just watch this video please. And no one was really watching it. That was my relative zero, I guess. No one was really watching it and that was fine. I kind of made my peace with it. I was like, okay, cool, I just sort of put it back to like the original thumbnail, the original title, and let it go. And then maybe last week, sometime last week, I started noticing like God, all the comments I'm getting are just on this video. Like, why, why is everything just this video? And then I realized, oh, this video. It's because this video is like really taking off. And it started going kind of nuts and getting like upwards of 10 to 12,000 views a day, like like it was sort of insane. What would oh nothing.

Speaker 1:

Oh, um, so I had the thing here that was.

Speaker 2:

There we go. Tom took a screenshot Like a screenshot.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, before this, because this is something this is not obviously like. It's not about when you do YouTube. It's not always all about the views and it's not always about like that kind of stuff. And I I don't want to go into what. I'm making it transparent. How do I change the scale of this? Like this there's a.

Speaker 2:

you know how you go to the court?

Speaker 1:

Oh there we go Try it. Um, I've used Decan before. This is not a thing you can predict. It's not a thing that says whether or not a video is successful, kind of like I said, I came to peace with the fact, like this is a niche video, that I'm really happy it was there and I had a really good time making and the few people who did watch it originally really enjoyed it. So it's like okay, cool. You know, I was fine with it, happy with it, but this is not something that would have happened on any other platform and obviously, like I have no idea why it happened here on YouTube. But suddenly you can see that crazy spike. We're like this spike?

Speaker 2:

Oh, there it is.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, for some. For some reason, and you can kind of see down there, this is from yesterday, so the numbers are a little different today, but you can see down there, it's browse.

Speaker 1:

For some reason, YouTube decided to start recommending this video to people and, based on a year later well, really more like six months, I guess later, but based on the comments, I'm getting it like it found the right people, because it's almost every comment is someone sharing their memories with this specific camera, Like how they either how they used it or had it, how they were able to save up and get it, Um, what it meant to them, or if they were someone like me who is just like a kid who drooled over it and never got one. But it's like all of those comments that I'm getting flooded with are really like high quality comments where people are actually interested in and engaging with the video and the topic and the subject and it's really cool. Um, I have no idea why that happened. This is not something you can predict or you know.

Speaker 1:

I don't think anyone tries to make a video like this will be really popular in six months or a year, but I think most of us who've done YouTube for a while have an experience like that where suddenly some random video just goes crazy at a random time and it can end, and probably will end as quickly as it started. But it's sort of neat. You know, it's a, it's a cool little boost. In this case, I'm glad it's a video. I'm glad it's that video Right Like. It's something that I would want the channel to be known for. It's something I want people to see. It's something I would want to make related to or follow up videos on. So it's kind of like a win-win.

Speaker 2:

Well, I think there's a lot of takeaways here, because one, when you made this video, like how many videos had you made before?

Speaker 1:

At that time probably like 450 plus.

Speaker 2:

Okay, so Tom had already made 450 videos. How many subscribers did you have off the top of your head?

Speaker 1:

Like 120.

Speaker 2:

120,000 subscribers. So like it's funny because you can have that experience, you know you can. You can be hundreds of videos in right, like you've already You've got it down. If you've been doing it that often and you, you know you're over a hundred thousand subscribers, so Obviously you've seen success. But you can still put your heart and soul to a video and it can tank, you know like it can. If you look at the, the relative to the rest of your channel, that video was a low performing video and then all of a sudden it just pops off like that is a crazy. That's crazy. Okay, this that, no, this way, like that's Crazy. You know, if you like covered this, you'd be like and this is, you know this is views over time. So that's why there's that increase.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, this is from last for it to just shoot up like that.

Speaker 2:

Now I, I don't, that's not something you can count on, but the fact that it's possible and the fact that, like, like you, you can say, oh, because you're a big channel, that that should. You should start with that Right. Like when you first published that video, you would expect, like, oh, you're a big channel, so I should do something like this, yeah, which I I don't think any other platform has uh, is doing this as well, but I think that the discovery on youtube is is the best.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, in terms of like content, creating platforms, because it does factor in watch history and search history of the viewer. So it's like you can do your best as a creator, make the best video that you can. Change the thumbnail, change the title, you know, fix your end cards like, try to make it suggested, push it out on instagram, send out a newsletter. You could do all you can, but you can. You could do all you can. That's it, like you're gonna, you're gonna have done all you can, but you don't know what's gonna happen six months from now. We're all of a sudden, you know, youtube finds like hey, all these people that are watching these things or subscribe to these kinds of channels actually really like this video and it's great because, you know, hopefully those are. Well, I think it's safe to say at this point A lot of those people are new to your channel for the very first time. Yeah, because they would have watched already.

Speaker 1:

Right. Well, I mean I can see like the increase in subscribers since that video took off again. Um, and you never know, like in this case you could see from the thing it was from brows. So youtube decided it found the people who would like that video for some reason. But another thing that can happen sometimes is you make your video. It sort of hangs out and then somebody else makes a related video.

Speaker 2:

That's incredibly popular that like furthers the conversation.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and now your video becomes recommended on that video which didn't exist when you made your video, and those. Those are things like. Again, it's not like a strategy you can incorporate into your video making.

Speaker 2:

It shouldn't be.

Speaker 1:

It shouldn't be. It's a happy accident if it ever happens, but it's something that can't happen on any other platform, like if, if you make something. I mean, unless I'm wrong, if someone has differing experience. I would really like to know this. But as far as I know, like on instagram or whatever, you post a reel, you post something on the tiktok. If it's six months later, it's not suddenly gonna like, like, pop off. I don't think I could be wrong.

Speaker 2:

No, I don't, I don't think so also. Uh, peter greg says your audio is way louder than mine.

Speaker 1:

Okay, I'll turn it down a little bit. There we go.

Speaker 2:

There you go. Thanks, peter, but yeah, I don't. I think I think the oldest thing I've seen, I mean and you have to be scrolling for a while is like two months.

Speaker 1:

Right, because you were getting some christmas stuff yesterday.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, because I I wasn't feeling good, so I Was. I had been on instagram a little bit too long. And you saw, I was starting to get like christmas stuff. But that's like the the oldest, like you'll. I'll never see anything from you know a year or anything like that.

Speaker 1:

Yeah yeah, and I mean, and it happens to me on youtube all the time where, like I will, it doesn't matter like I can watch.

Speaker 2:

You know, I don't know dog videos, here's a golden retriever video, whatever, and then I'll see one from 12 years ago get recommended well, I think the biggest takeaway from this is if you make a video that you're excited about and it's nice because you're in a position where you can contextualize Okay, like someone who might be new might look at that and be like, well, I'm not doing youtube anymore because it's you know, no, no one saw it Right. And then you can just stop, but you have the context of like, look, I've got. You know, this is our business. We have 400 other videos that people can watch or are watching as you just keep going. Move on to the next video. Yeah, but the thing is that when you made that video, you were having fun. Yes, and you are sharing something that is fun for you, and now, whenever New people find it, they're into it.

Speaker 1:

They're just as into it as you are, they're also seeing this like the side of me that I would want them to see, right to some. You know, sometimes I can't think of any specific examples for me, thankfully, but sometimes you know, someone can make a video that's like no, okay, no. I've made a couple videos, like the VHS transfer one where it's like I'm gonna be about converting old tapes to digital and stuff and it is still one of my most popular videos to this day and a lot of people found it helpful. But it also sort of attracted, like this audience that I didn't really want your postmates video from back in the day, oh yeah.

Speaker 1:

Like those kinds of things that video.

Speaker 2:

I had a berry. That was so far down listed your most popular video. I unlisted probably I don't know five of my most popular videos because I was just like this is not YouTube, is not. It's not bringing in the right people and I don't. I just don't the video. I want to shut that door.

Speaker 1:

The numbers are going up, but it wasn't in the way that you wanted him to and and that's what's kind of cool now is like this video. Specifically, I had a couple follow-up videos that I wanted to make, which I was still going to make, but they were really low on my priority list because I was like, well, if the main video didn't get People that interested, the follow-up about like a niche of a niche is Nobody's gonna watch that for sure. So I still want to make it because I want to make it, but you know, I'm gonna sort of check off all these other videos that I think are a little smarter for me to make now. But now, because of this and because it did help grow the channel and now that audience is there, those videos that were lower priority can be bumped up to higher priority because I know there are people there who are likely to find I'm interesting, because they found this other video interesting.

Speaker 2:

Jared says hi, good to see you here. Rocky has a question, I'm gonna leave that for a second. Peter Greg, her YouTube employees say that they are much more audio driven and recommends rather than topic driven.

Speaker 1:

Oh, Maybe audience audio.

Speaker 2:

Top.

Speaker 1:

I'm gonna guess audience driven and recommends rather than topic.

Speaker 2:

I believe that because I think that someone's watch history is Going to be more of a Better indicator. Yeah, then you know, I mean like which, which can work against you? Because, as a creator, because, like you know, if someone's letting the mood to watch your video, then right, you know, all of a sudden Birds eating out of bird feeders gets recommended and then that per you know, you've lost that person because they're, they've gone down a different rabbit hole.

Speaker 2:

But I think like but? But also on the flip side of that is, if you find you know A video about a camera that's 25 years old and you're super into that you're, then you're gonna be super in to this guy. So it's like it works. You know both ways. Sammy says maybe tick tock, it can pop off.

Speaker 1:

I know tick tock's you know, algorithm as far as recommending stuff is, obviously I don't know because I'm not on it, but it's supposedly Pretty phenomenal when it comes to like keeping you on there and watching stuff, and so that's the one I was thinking might be able to pull something that's a little older just because it thinks like this is perfect for this person and we'll keep them here. But it also hasn't been. You can't watch a 12 year old tick tock, like it's not possible. So Basically, it's all random.

Speaker 2:

Great, I honestly I think that's what I think. You never, you can't. Yeah, you can't, it's random, but it's like it's almost like winning the lottery, like you.

Speaker 1:

It's not a thing to count on, but you can't win if you don't have a ticket, and creating on YouTube is at least getting your ticket.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I like that Tech trouble maker says do this until it stops being fun, then pivot to fun again. Yes, yes, preach, I want a coffee. I thought I was going to miss mainstream. You're here. That's great point, heather. Genuine. Authentic passion translates yeah, think about. I mean, I just had someone Message me the other day about.

Speaker 1:

They got selected to start like an after-school video production program for students. They're into it, but they're like I don't know where to begin teaching the stuff. I don't know what resources do you have, and so I directed them like some, some of my old lesson plans and stuff. But I was trying to tell them, like that stuff's helpful, having a good lesson plan is cool, having your classroom, having equipment, all that. But honestly, like if you are Into this and you're excited about it and you're in the classroom with students and everyone's sharing a smartphone as a camera or whatever, like it'll be great Because as long as the students can tell that you are into it and you're excited about it, that will overcome everything else.

Speaker 2:

Lesson plan any, yeah and I mean I can speak from experience that that is 100% the case.

Speaker 1:

And even if you have, you know, a state of the art studio and all the gear in the world and the coolest lesson plans, if the teacher is just someone who got roped into like they got a little extra stipend to stay after school and do this thing, it's gonna crash and burn because no one's gonna care. And I think the same thing is true with anything, but obviously especially YouTube videos. Your program is going to be a little bit more fun, especially YouTube videos. You're you watch something from someone who doesn't want to be there making it. You're gonna kind of feel that versus somebody who's like into it.

Speaker 2:

Okay, rocky, let's go back to your question. Speaking of referencing old youtube content, I talk about multiple comics on my channel. How do you recommend setting up content for the future about multiple things feels different from reviews on one item? Uh Well, there's cards and playlists and playlists. That's kind of yeah, yeah, and let's see you. You talk about like things a lot.

Speaker 1:

I do talk about things like objects, damn it. You know, I mean like products.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so it's like because I was gonna. Mine is like not.

Speaker 1:

They're digital.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, they're not there. You go in tangible as the word Um, you talk about tangible things so you can say, hey, like I'm talking about this 25 year old camera, but let me tell you about you know, let me compare it to the, the camera I'm using today. Right, and then now you can reference that video and I think it's very uh. It can be very organic, doesn't have to be like who washes video next or whatever.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it can definitely be organic and you can. You can curate stuff. Obviously. We mentioned playlists, but then putting those playlists on like your channel's homepage or you can have the different sections and stuff, Um it's really cool.

Speaker 1:

So let's show that you know if you if you have Videos about, say, of three different comics that have different videos about them. It's not that those videos I'll have to connect, but you can put these little playlists in these little sections Like here's one comic, here's the videos for that, here's the next comic, the videos for that next comic, almost like different series. Um, you can do that, that kind of thing there and that's that's really really helpful. I always feel like when I go to somebody's YouTube channel and this happens with small or large channels and their homepage is essentially blank, even though they have like 200 videos or something, that's a really missed opportunity to like put your best foot forward.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, curate, curate your own content, Like if you know that you can probably think like when, if you're as you're making a video, you can just like kind of think about other videos that you made and then just be like, how can, if someone likes this video, they're probably gonna like this other video I made, even though it's like six months old or whatever.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and they wouldn't know about it otherwise. Maybe because, even though the algorithm is smart, maybe it's not that smart to make that connection. So, you know, I do that all the time, like, oh, you know, I don't know. Here let me talk about this thing. Oh, anyway, this windscreen. I made a whole video about it. You can check it out there. Blah, blah, blah, like if you know someone's gonna have a question about something.

Speaker 2:

GojaniGo has a question. If you do a live then save it to videos, Do you keep it in live also or delete the live?

Speaker 1:

If you're keeping or at least what I do, I don't know if you're keeping. If you do a live stream, it ends. I mean you do this right here with this and then you keep it up available for replay. It'll always be under the live section in your channel. Yes, so here, if you were to download the live stream, edit it into a tighter video and put it up in videos, then it's up to you, I guess, if you would wanna keep the live, the original unedited live up.

Speaker 2:

So, jani, this is my tutorial channel and if you go to videos, you don't see the YouTube huddle up here, right? But if you go to live, here's where the YouTube huddle up is. And, like Thomas saying, if I were to download one of these videos and then edit it, then if I upload it it would go to videos. I don't know if that answers your question.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, but even that I'm kinda thinking could be sorta neat. You'd do an hour-long live stream.

Speaker 2:

That's what Kat did.

Speaker 1:

You edit it down into an eight minute video or something, but then even in that video you can recommend the full, unedited live stream for people who are interested in that.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, all right, let's catch up. Rocky, you can't win if you don't have a ticket gold. I also got the quote all work, works from Think Media today. Oh, there you go there, you go, all work works.

Speaker 1:

I like it.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so that was cool.

Speaker 1:

So that was one of my things. What's one of your things?

Speaker 2:

One of my things is it's been so what? It's been the third week of the YouTube huddle up, which is here's our scoreboard. I'm just so excited about it because we've got, you know, let's see 27 people that have signed up.

Speaker 1:

That's crazy. That's a full class, Like that's it.

Speaker 2:

So crazy that have signed up And-.

Speaker 1:

It's free.

Speaker 2:

It's free. It's over on my tutorial channel. So it's at youtubecom. Slash, heather Ramirez.

Speaker 2:

This is basically just a weekly accountability where you can check in every Wednesday at 1 pm, pacific Standard Time. Let us know what your goal for the following week is. So here's everyone's goals. Here's like here's my goal. So be your own nerd. Wants to create two new videos by next Wednesday and then he can check in next Wednesday saying, hey, I made those two videos and then you get a sticker if you hit your goal. So it's just like it's been night.

Speaker 2:

We had this like two years ago. I was doing this and then I wanted to bring it back because I missed it so much. But also I need the accountability for me and it's just nice to it's. My favorite part about it is being part of a group. Is that? That's like working on something that is also similar to what I'm working on. You know, I think that's like I don't know. I don't know. That's essentially what a community is at its essence, but I wanted to, I wanted to kick it off and you know I just missed it. So it's been super fun and my takeaway there is it's not too late to do YouTube. It feel. I feel like a lot of the stuff in my feed is kind of painting this picture like being a content creator is like very stressful, which that's true, but I can't tell you how many like thumbnails of like this face that.

Speaker 2:

I've seen of like YouTubers are quitting. Youtubers are, you know, content creators are leaving, and it's just. It feels very like I don't know, sad yeah.

Speaker 1:

Do a little boom.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, but every time I'm on the YouTube I'm like this is so cool. It's just cool to see how creative people can be, how everyone's channel is so different and you know, I think it's an exciting time.

Speaker 1:

I have a. I have a weekly hockey game at the same time as the Huddled Up, so I haven't been able to watch it. But what I've noticed is your hour long show, because I usually get home at like 2.30, and sometimes you're barely just getting off the stream there.

Speaker 2:

I told myself to cut it off at two because I don't want to. You know, I don't have people to feel like they have to stay longer. So I was like, okay, I gotta cap it at two.

Speaker 1:

But I think to the passion thing that we were talking about earlier, like it's something I've only heard you talk about in a positive way, Like I got, I want to get ready for this. I want to do that. You know you're telling me the stories of what people are sharing and what happened on the Huddled Up, and it's you know, I feel like I can tell you're looking forward to it every week.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's just, it's I don't know. It's just a cool when everyone, when it feels like the conversation is steering towards. Like you know, youtube is hard. It's nice to see, like, well, that's not stopping these people it obviously didn't stop any successful YouTube creator, because it's always hard every step of the way. It's not uniquely hard now. Yes, there are different things, like AI is a huge concern that we should all be thinking about, but there was a time where not everyone had a smartphone and that's not mom and dad's generation, that's me, you know, that was us. So I don't know, it's just, it's like I feel like there's always a. I like that I can shine a light on people who are still very excited about it, you know, and they're still pushing themselves creatively. I think that's a, it's a fun thing that I am very proud of.

Speaker 1:

I think you have a good proof of concept too, because you did it. How long was the original run?

Speaker 2:

I don't know. Actually it was many months. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

So a couple of years ago, when you started the Huddle Up, did it super consistently for a few months and then you know like it went on hiatus. A lot of those channels are still going.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

So I feel like that's a good.

Speaker 2:

I know it's crazy.

Speaker 1:

That's a good track record of okay. When you have this kind of nurturing environment as you're starting and launching, it really helps. I know, oh my God. Now, what was this? Six years ago, a year after I started my channel, I joined a little. Was it a Discord? I think it was a Discord group. It was the first Discord I ever joined for, like you know, oh yeah, youtube creators and stuff.

Speaker 1:

And that was really cool, like that was. That was a very janky version of this, a very low tech version of this, but it really made a difference. And there were maybe like nine people in there but it I think obviously I would have continued without it, but I think it really helped me keep going after, like the initial high of YouTube excitement were off and I kind of want to see I think most people I know out of like the nine people, two or three have passed 100,000 in the group and one, yeah, and one person I laughed because I remember when I got my channel monetized I was part of that group. There was another guy in there who was like man.

Speaker 1:

I've been making all these videos Like I can't even imagine getting the point of having a thousand subscribers or whatever. Who's now at 1.17 million? So, and that's pretty cool, cause it's like you can watch these channels and I'm just seeing how it's still super active Hundreds and hundreds of thousands of views per video, not just on channels. It's crazy, and I wonder if that would have happened without the little supportive community of people to go like oh yeah, keep going, try this through feedback, let's talk about banners, let's talk about all that stuff, and so it's cool that the huddle up in 2024 can still provide that to people who are psyched about YouTube.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, speak of introvert amateurs here, Hello everyone. Kids are now sleeping and now able to join. Yeah, introvert amateur has done both iterations of the YouTube huddle up and is seeing success right now and it's very exciting.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's awesome.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, Rocky says YouTube community has blown my mind. It's a crazy thing. I wake up every day now excited, engage with it, Like now I'm here to bring positivity. It's harder but the payoff is greater.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, 100%. I do get excited. I do genuinely get excited, like checking my email and first comments and messages of the day, because it's like what happened, Like who's gonna you never, you really never know who's gonna suddenly speaking of the Canon XL1, I got an Instagram message from someone who worked on the design team for the XL1.

Speaker 2:

That's so crazy.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, they were like this video popped up in my feed, so there's the algorithm at work right there. He worked on this camera in the 90s and he was like it was so cool to see this video, which made me feel really good with. One of the people who helped design the camera approved this video.

Speaker 2:

See like right there, like how cool is that.

Speaker 1:

And he was like it reminds me of like this really fun time in my life. I'm still in touch with a lot of people from the team, so I shared the video with them. It's like that is awesome and that's not a message you're gonna wake up expecting. Yeah, like what a cool.

Speaker 2:

Thing.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, amazing that's so cool. Absolute highlight. That's really cool.

Speaker 2:

Well, did you have another thing you noticed?

Speaker 1:

I did, it's sort of the opposite of spending six weeks on a video.

Speaker 2:

Okay.

Speaker 1:

So I had a video come out yesterday.

Speaker 2:

Oh, that's right. Yes, okay, well, let me pull it up.

Speaker 1:

Sure.

Speaker 2:

You could tell me. I know I'm trying to think of how to contextualize this?

Speaker 1:

So, basically what this is. There's a video that came out yesterday. It's 34 minutes long and it's unedited.

Speaker 2:

Right here, this guy.

Speaker 1:

I mean, it has a thumbnail and a little bit of music at the end, but there's no cuts. There's not a single cut in the video.

Speaker 2:

It is Well not a single cut. No, it's unedited.

Speaker 1:

There's no punching in, punching out there's not a B roll shot even times where I, even when I was recording, I was like I'll be overlaying this clip here and I'll put this clip here. No, it's a one take, it's a one take.

Speaker 2:

Okay.

Speaker 1:

I'm actually into a podcast episode about this because I've learned a lot from the reaction, which I didn't really expect. So the impetus behind this was I had been watching some older YouTube channels, like old school Dave Dugdale videos if you're in the camera community old school DSLR video shooters, stuff from like the 2011, 2012 era, where a lot of videos really were just somebody sort of Sitting and talking, and not even product videos, because I know a sitting and talking video about ideas is still really common right now. But someone has a thing to review and the review video is literally them sitting there telling you about it and like, look at this and there's this and there's that, it does this, and obviously like there's things to be said for. Like if I tell you this thing has a certain feature here, and then I can insert a B roll clip that shows the feature there, that's a helpful thing to do and it ain't. You know editing. I love editing.

Speaker 1:

I'm not gonna not edit videos anymore, yeah, but I really liked the vibe of those old-school videos I was watching and I remember like those are what really hooked me into becoming a regular YouTube viewer, where it didn't just become a Place to go look up funny clips, like it had channels I checked in on regularly and, obviously, in today's world of hyper, hyper over editing, that's a little different, and so I wanted to make this video that's been on my list again forever.

Speaker 1:

Just about like pieces of Relatively affordable, underrated you know, camera, audio gear, like things that I use all the time that aren't worth making a whole video about. But you know, if I put 10 of them in one video, that's cool. And I decided, instead of doing that, I'm just gonna have a pile of stuff over here off camera and I'm just gonna pick things up, tell you about the thing, pick the next thing, I'm gonna tell you about the thing and just sort of see what happened. And I was really nervous about that because I was. I was going for the tone and the vibe of an old-school video, but I was worried people were gonna think it was lazy.

Speaker 1:

Okay because I mean, honestly, like the video is 34 minutes to it's 34 minutes long, it Took 36 minutes to film. You know, like there's a little bit before and a little bit after that I was, as I was again ready and it took you know no time to edit. I threw on supporter names at the end, added my outro song, justed the color a little bit. I mean it took maybe 10 minutes to edit, so it made the whole video in under an hour.

Speaker 1:

Okay, and then it could be uploaded. Yeah, so for me that's easy, like that is easy, and it reduced a lot of stress and I was like, okay, this almost does feel like cheating.

Speaker 2:

So what was the response?

Speaker 1:

It was freaking one out of ten. You want to talk about my six week XL one video. That's ten out of ten. They got like I don't know where it's at nine thousand views in a day, or something which is.

Speaker 2:

That's a lot for you quite good for my normal videos.

Speaker 1:

An average video might get Two to three thousand in the first day okay, it's significantly above that, beating out the more higher edited videos that I've done recently, like stuff about microphones and roadcaster and whatever Promptor and all that stuff. And what was really cool is the comments. There's a handful. Maybe I've gotten five. I think there's 150 comments on the now I've gotten five. That have been like please go back to editing videos. You're wasting too much of our time. Like it's really annoying me. You're just waving something for the camera. Show me a shot of the thing, like people complaining about it.

Speaker 1:

Okay but I think out of all those other comments there must be at least 30 that are people like I love this kind of thing. I'm. It's a lot of people saying they like seeing this older style of video, and not even just me, but they've noticed other channels, kind of going back to this. This style of video and they like that things breathe and I was really surprised by that. So it's been hugely positive. Yeah, which has been cool. Yeah, crazy surprise.

Speaker 2:

It's funny cuz like, oh my gosh, I'll know. We talk about video length all the time and I think we're at the point where there is no ideal video link. That's just it. There's just so many things that it depends on, because this video that you're talking about is 34 minutes long and I feel like before people would be last way too long. Right, that's way too long. We got a.

Speaker 2:

You know, you, it's still got chapter markers people's Attention spans are fading, so we got to make it quick and stuff like that. You know, I Think this is a good thing. I think, like you know, it went from it has to be edited to keep it really short to oh, now we have to make it long because we want to insert mineral ads, so they just kind of like became intentionally long in the same way they were intentionally short, but this you're not putting any care into that.

Speaker 1:

You're not long as it is.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's as long as it is and it's all one take. Yeah, I think that's a cool.

Speaker 1:

It's really it's really cool and it's something that I definitely want to mix in From time to time not every video you know, because in the pendulum it's going too far and it's like oh, thank you for making like a Short, concise video, but every once in a while, based on the topic, it could be really fun to just do one of these here. Um, and there's a couple things there's. There's two jokes specifically in the video that popped out that people keep referencing in the comments as like, I guess, thinking they were funny, which are jokes that Probably would have been edited out of a An edited.

Speaker 2:

An edited.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, because not that the jokes are bad or anything, but they're. They're kind of like fumbly and it's more the kind of joke you make when you're hanging out with someone, not a joke that like Then we're gonna cut to the next thing. So it's like they're. They're in the moment. There of the moment almost feels like you're in the inside joke because it's sort of like a funny thing that happened. It almost feels like it's happening together because you're watching me like come up with it right and then share. It's not a polish like.

Speaker 2:

Auto coffee says no cuts. Honestly, I didn't really notice what thank you. Kombucha says that video felt like we were just hanging out and you were doing show and tell. I enjoyed it.

Speaker 1:

That's what I want. I mean, it's almost like a live stream.

Speaker 2:

Well, let me ask you why didn't you do it live?

Speaker 1:

I had the thought and the reason. The reason for me was because I wanted mentally to be able to focus on the topic and not like the chat and the network connections and you know all that stuff the live streaming words You're doing right now, but it can. Sometimes your brain isn't doing two things.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and you're thinking about two things. Sure, I Didn't want to worry about that, because the one caveat here which might sound like I'm tuning my own horn and I'm not is I'm not saying never edit your videos, press record and just babble for 30 minutes. I did have an outline I was following.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

I did. I did run through my head like the order things were gonna go in. I did have everything I needed like position right but it was also a good topic.

Speaker 1:

For that it was a good topic that lent itself to that, naturally and I also, which a couple people point out, the comment like I was a teacher for 11 years, so like speaking long form and trying to make sense and make it sort of engaging and slightly interesting, is a thing that I had to practice For a long time. It's not something I could always do, it's it's a skill that had to be built up and so if it's not a skill that you've ever practiced and you just press record, try to talk for 30 minutes. It.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I tried. I, after the huddle up, I told everyone on the YouTube huddle of us I'm gonna record a video as soon as I push finish with this live stream, I'm gonna record a video. And I babbled for 19 minutes and I was like this is going into the trash because I just I can't, I can't, I Couldn't do it.

Speaker 1:

Well, you know what you know. It made me think that it there was something to. It was a couple months ago I started doing like patreon channel supporter updates for a couple things, when it was sort of like this it was just ecam press record.

Speaker 2:

I'm gonna babble about a thing and whatever good feedback from that yes and I was surprised.

Speaker 1:

I used to do text updates and I would almost like a blog post like. Here's a link. Here's a photo and people told me they really liked that. They it was almost like a podcast, they could just listen to it, they could do whatever, and they like much preferred that over the text thing, which surprised me and then I kind of thought, well, these are people who've already like opted into the channel to be supporters, to go above and beyond, so maybe they're a normal YouTube subscriber Wouldn't.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, maybe they're more they're more on board with like a special thing Another person wouldn't. But then I started thinking like well, I got that same feeling from those old-school YouTube videos. Why not? And if that's your experience, yeah, just because things evolved from that style over the years doesn't mean we can't go back and revisit it.

Speaker 2:

Textual maker says I loved it. You really say minimally edit. I loved you. Release a minimally edit video. I want to buying the suction cup. You mount, you recommended.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and now I think I said it in the video, but I found out about it's a GoPro suction cup mount, but I got it when I was doing flight training because it was recommended by a bunch of aviation channels. So people use them on the outside airplanes and stuff like it's a good mount.

Speaker 2:

It's for an amateur says. To be honest, I like that older style more. Nowadays, since everything seems to be over edited, that style looks For me more like a human conversation.

Speaker 1:

And I remember this evolution, which is funny because I remember watching those old videos where it's a person just saying One thing. You know, like here's one shot talking about a thing and I remember, especially in the camera niche, as cameras got better and you know, someone would then put in a b-roll shot and it wouldn't just be a shot of it, but it was a nice looking shot.

Speaker 1:

And I remember, specifically like 2013 or so, people started getting sliders and so you could suddenly like the cameras moving and some really shamed way yeah everything still has to be manually focused, but then people focusing on the lighting that's where a lot of people started building up their like video production skill sets was. There's things like that, and then it evolves into, you know, what is now essentially a Hollywood production to make a YouTube video, and I understand. That's one thing which there's a lot of good about it, but it's like we don't have to also never go back to the other two.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, obs is here. Paul is also here for your life, heather. He is the next OJ. Those gloves and sandbags, let's see. I think this is exciting, especially since the conversation about AI is like so big right now. I think I call me a blind optimist, but I feel like humans are always going to value human-to-human conversation, in whatever format that is delivered. But I really think that I think this is, you know, evidence of that. Let's see, film photography creators do these styles of videos all the time and have over a hundred thousand subs and get a lot of views, so it's definitely working. That video wouldn't have translated well to a live stream, but it's great as is.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I feel like I would have gotten so distracted and almost sort of and frustrating to watch as a live stream if you're watching the replay, because I would have gotten derailed.

Speaker 2:

Real live versus recorded. I totally agree with your thoughts about getting distracted by the chat. It's so true, I love the chat, but keeping up with them and staying on track is a whole thing.

Speaker 1:

Which maybe is different about this show, because it was, from the beginning, supposed to be a live stream.

Speaker 2:

Yeah so incorporating the chat is part of it. We have done couples table episodes. Remember we recorded a couple of tables we did a few online. Well, one time we did a live and we told everyone we're not going to look at the chat and then just talked and then after 30 minutes we were like checking in back the chat. I remember the feedback being like wow, that was really cool.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Because obviously our goal with the couple's table is to have a conversation that the chat can participate in. Because, yes, we're sharing our experience as content creators, but the whole point is to have a discussion with other, whether you're a content creator or not. You're a YouTube user.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

So it's nice to hear from different perspectives. But, yeah, we tried doing like recorded episodes and episodes where you're just watching us.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, every once in a while, the ones where they were just watching us. That was interesting and people seemed to enjoy it. But I know, as we were talking, about it.

Speaker 2:

I felt like I was ignoring someone at the time.

Speaker 1:

That's weird. The pre-recorded ones, I think, worked because sometimes there was a topic where it was like it's a topic that we almost didn't want to lose track of but we wanted to explore together and so it made sense through the pre-recorded one. But for the most part, obviously, the point of this show is to have a conversation, Is to be a two-way street.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

So the chat is not a distraction, it's part of it, yeah.

Speaker 2:

It's totally part of it, yeah.

Speaker 1:

Okay, oh yeah, Mike Sorry.

Speaker 2:

Okay, let's do this, and then I go to go back to Rocky's question. I see it, rocky, I'm not ignoring it. Hey, everyone Glad Tom did that for a reviewer. It's great to put more emphasis on a personal touch and not cut out too much just for the sake of getting down to certain time. Time codes do fine, yeah. I think that also changed everything.

Speaker 1:

Right the fact that it is an unedited video, but you can skip to the part you want? Yeah, and I mentioned that at the beginning, like you got chapter markers.

Speaker 2:

I think chapter markers changed everything and I also think podcasts changed everything, because people are used to. I'm just going to put us 34 minutes, I'm going to put this on and I'm going to go clean the house.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I love it. I love it when I find like, yeah, I need to vacuum and here's 45 minutes Awesome, I don't want to totally have had the thought of oh, this is only eight minutes.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, Let me find a longer video.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I don't want to have to come back and find something else. Yeah, exactly, I don't want to be interrupted.

Speaker 2:

That's funny. See, go, johnny, go. I just want to say thanks for Wednesdays, heather, and both of you for Fridays. I was part of the original Hadoop but quit after one to two weeks, never even got my name on the board. Well, we're glad to have you now, and your dogs are super adorable. Actually, I'd love to know what kind of dog he that this Johnny was the live stream I was watching yesterday.

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah, okay, I thought parts of that he took his dogs to the park and they were very well behaved on the leash, and I was saying that that's not how our dogs are. No, but I'd love to know what kind of dogs you are. Okay, now let's go back to Rocky's question. Do you guys have thoughts on having a schedule for your videos? Is that valuable for a new creator? Does YouTube audience care in this day and age of on demand content and built in notifications? Oh man.

Speaker 1:

This is individual. There's no right or wrong. I think I can say I think there's a right.

Speaker 2:

Oh, what's the right, I think, for a new creator. What I would say is that you should have a regular schedule until you have built a book library, because I don't. I think it's rare for a new viewer to subscribe to a channel that is empty and sporadic, you know. So if you have like, you know, there's a point where you're uploading like every day and then you take a three month break and then you start posting and you know, I think people look and just be like is this channel so active? So I think there should, you should build up to the point where there is a library and then someone can scroll. Maybe you can cure at your homepage and have a playlist so people can, you know, find or find what they really want in terms of your content. But then after that, I don't think there's a right or wrong, because Tom and I do it very differently.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I think it's worth experimenting and see what you like and don't like.

Speaker 2:

You've done it both ways now.

Speaker 1:

I've always had a schedule and I've always had scheduled videos like finished videos ready to go. And then I tried not doing that last year. The good news is that's when I got to make the XL one video, because I spent six weeks on a single video and a couple other couple other videos like that. But I quickly found out that that I actually hated that. Then I spent months trying to get my channel back on track. It didn't work for me. Totally works for some people and it's important to try that. And the thing too, like Heather said, about being consistent. I was saying being regular, but that's a different thing. Being consistent when you start out is good because it gets you past that initial excitement Like you make your first video, it's awesome, maybe even your second one.

Speaker 1:

But once you get into the fourth, fifth, sixth video, that's usually where it's like if there's a fatigue, like the newness has worn off and the grind is over. And you kind of want to push through that a little bit and see how you feel about it.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, there we go. We caught up with the comments.

Speaker 1:

Okay, I was like yeah okay, yeah.

Speaker 2:

So because there's channels that don't have, there's evidence for both.

Speaker 1:

That's what this is Right, and that's the thing with YouTube is like you can find best practices for anything Like look at this channel that does these rules. This channel does the exact opposite.

Speaker 2:

I will show you a successful channel that's doing it the total opposite way, yeah, so yeah, so it's more about we always talk about sustainability.

Speaker 1:

It's about what works for you, so you can keep doing this for as long as you want.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, was that everything you wanted to talk about? I just want to make sure that we those are my two main points that you noticed.

Speaker 1:

That I noticed about those were interesting things. Video randomly taken off when half another platform and audience being open and receptive to a planned out but unedited video. Yeah, I think I think unedited sometimes gets mushed with unplanned, and that's In my case. That wasn't the situation.

Speaker 2:

There is a difference, yeah, there was a plan.

Speaker 1:

There wasn't a script or anything, but there was an outline, like you know. Here's the things, and even in the video you can see me like wait, what's next? Okay, this.

Speaker 2:

Well, here's something that I can, since we have some time left. One thing that I've noticed is or not noticed, but my View on shorts is changing. I'm not saying that I'm gonna like now just do that, but Colin Smear did a podcast recently and they talked about how they were watching what some huge like sports thing I don't know if it was a Super Bowl, it was some huge sports thing that was on YouTube TV and then, during commercials, would scroll through shorts, and so now you have one viewer going through two different products on your same platform, which is like I think that there's. I think that says so much because, like, I think this is what YouTube wanted is to not, if you're in a scrolly mood, like you don't know what you wanna watch, you're not looking for anything in particular, you're just bored because you're watching commercials.

Speaker 2:

Don't pick up TikTok, don't pick up Instagram. We have a shelf of the same kind of content that you can scroll through also, and so no one leaves. So I think that YouTube achieved its goal, which is interesting because I think it was rocky to start, but having done the live stream with James, which I think is so worth watching. So, if you're, if you are still trying to figure out short form vertical content. Just hearing his perspective, like totally, cause I've only heard bad things, up until talking to James, we've only. Well, actually my experience has been like whatever's, but yours was like bad enough to not continue.

Speaker 1:

Mine on my channel was bad, but making short form stuff for like Instagram. My second channel has actually been really fun, like the hockey videos and things or it's been experimenting. But on my channel, yeah, a lot some of them were were bringing in. Like there's one of them I had to like just turn off comments and then people would like go find other shorts and be like since you turned off comments on that one yours like funny. Go eat lunch Like come on, so.

Speaker 2:

So my perspective on shorts is changing. I want to try. My goal for March is to try. I'm just gonna try it. I need to experiment.

Speaker 1:

I've been having a lot of fun. I've been doing mic'd up hockey videos and it's cool cause I got my old school Canon EOS R so I've been not filming with my phone, but you know, it's been fun to like play with the audio. I literally started just recording them vertically. I mounted like a monopod mount on the side of the camera so it can click in vertically, so it's all like framing stuff that way. It's totally different. Like communicating visually is so different. It's been fun Like I've just had a good time like figuring out. I've gotten to play with my GoPro that has the full frame. Like you can film one shot and then crop it to be horizontal or vertical because it's the full resolution of the sensor.

Speaker 2:

Which has been awesome because, like you know what I loved about James, this is workflow. That he just does it on his phone and edits it in the car on the way home, all on the phone and edits on the way home and it's done.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, no, that's really cool.

Speaker 2:

And he gets thousands, tens of thousands.

Speaker 1:

Of dollars.

Speaker 2:

No views. I mean, I don't know what the dollar amount is, but like it's encouraging to be that, like you know, you don't need fancy, because you know me, I'm not into the gear.

Speaker 1:

No, you're not, but I am, and so it's yeah, so it's great you can do it. Either way, it's been a fun outlet for that, yeah, and for things that I hadn't used or you know whatever Like an old camera's been sitting for a couple of years.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, Okay, real quick. Um says I am very happy that you both got me going, even if shortly. Every day.

Speaker 1:

Oh yeah, you're kicking butt.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, you're doing great. Rocky says so. Basically you're saying it's all random again. Yes, Great insight. Thanks so much. I have some playlists already and trying to be somewhat consistent every week with at least some content.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, so much is just finding what works for you.

Speaker 2:

I hate making shorts, but catch myself watching them and watching them a lot when sitting down and not knowing what I'm in the mood for. Yeah, that does. The thing is like I. I feel like I need to give it a try because I feel like my resistance right now is very, is like the boomer thing of like oh, that's the new.

Speaker 2:

yeah, it's the new thing? I don't know, everyone's going. You know long form. I just hear it. I can hear the excuses and I just I want to go back to 2016. Heather, who had a point and shoot camera and was like I don't know what, I don't know anything, but I'm just going to take my camera out into the world and see what I can make. And it was just fun. There was no wrong, it was just sandbox time.

Speaker 1:

So maybe here's a point that we can wrap up with is, I think, a thing that maybe all of us have experienced, whether it's school work, youtube, whatever.

Speaker 2:

Ooh tell us when you start doing something.

Speaker 1:

The way that things are when you start feels like the right way and how they should be.

Speaker 2:

Yes.

Speaker 1:

If you join YouTube in 2016 and everybody's making vlogs and doing that, that's how YouTube feels like it should be. If you start working at a job and you have, you know these other coworkers and these office policies and these methods, of doing things Product protocols, procedures yeah, this is how it should be.

Speaker 1:

Over time, obviously, things change and evolve and it can start to feel like you're moving away from how they should be. But one thing I've also noticed, especially teaching, was like this Like when I my first year teaching, that senior class was like that's how seniors should be, for better or worse. And then afterwards it was like oh everything. But then you realize, say you're working at a place it shifts over time and it feels like, oh, this isn't how it should be For a new employee who's starting right. Then for them, that's their should, that's their new. Like this is how it should be. And I think that's important to recognize so that you can realize it's not how it should be, it's how you were introduced to it and you can sometimes that you have a bias.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah it's a bias. You can maybe be aware of your bias, take it away and then look at the new thing just for what it is. And I think that's really important now for content creators in a world where platforms and tools and audience and everything has changed over the past few years, to not be stuck in our old ways and with our old biases. To pull back, look at what things are and then almost pretend like you're jumping in for the first time.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, exactly that's what I wanna do and so what I told. We talked about this all the time, but I'm gonna put it out here. One of my hopes for March is for me and Tom to collaborate on. Shorts is gonna be experimental, cause I have no expectations, but that's see, this is when it's fun, cause it's just the sandbox. But Tom has been able to scratch the itch of these other photo video skill sets by incorporating it into hockey, and I want him to help me make jump rope videos. So I'm gonna try to make. I'm gonna jump.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I can't, but like instead of just being like Tom. Can you like you know?

Speaker 1:

do it. Can I just hold the camera?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, do what the tripod's doing, like let's see if we can come up with something different.

Speaker 1:

I mean, I had one really fun idea last night that I'm excited about. It's a very simple idea, but I think it'll be fun.

Speaker 2:

Cause the thing with any content is the novelty like something being really impressive is only gonna be impressive the first time. So I can't just jump Like it's gotta be something else, there's gotta be something different, something there's not even any conflict there. You know there's nothing interesting there.

Speaker 1:

And think about like drones are a really good example. 10, well now, 10 plus years ago, when drones were first becoming consumer accessible, there were videos where people could literally I remember watching, like these low pro whether they were low quality, whether they were go pros or other brands these low quality cameras being put on a shaky drone and flying through, you know anywhere, it didn't matter a neighborhood, the desert, whatever, but no one had seen it.

Speaker 1:

No one had seen it. Video has half a million views or whatever because it's just like oh my God. Like you would normally have to charter a helicopter to do this, and there was maybe a six month to a year long period where it's like you just post drone videos.

Speaker 1:

That's it. You don't need, there's nothing more. I didn't have to look that great. Obviously, people got tired of that. People got better at using drones. It became more of it, and now I find myself like sometimes double tapping to skip through, like someone's majestic Icelandic thing, or like here's New York city in all its glory Ocean waves, All right anyway what's the point and like that's like the novelty wears off and then it becomes you know.

Speaker 1:

Meanwhile there's other times where you see something like a drone shot that's being used super effectively where, like the point or the story or the whatever wouldn't be able to be conveyed without it. And it's like, wow, what a cool way to use that thing and it's-.

Speaker 2:

Right, that right Like what a cool way to use that thing. I don't know what that is, but I'm excited to experiment.

Speaker 1:

It comes with experimentation.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, All right. So Mike says I hate making shorts, but catch myself watching. Oh, I already said that, mike, the hockey videos are great.

Speaker 2:

Thank you, I do 15 second comic reviews through shorts that are all edited using the YouTube app, takes me 15 to 20 minutes each one and gets my highest number of views and fastest. Hey TikTok, but this has been minimal effort to try. That's cool, you know. I'm curious. Why are you? Have you used CapCut? Have you tried CapCut? Cause I feel like CapCut is the shorts, the default, the default shorts editor app. But I'm curious about the YouTube app Cause when I used it it was horrendous, but that was a while ago, like two years ago, so I'm curious. Anyway, all right, all right. Time to clear the table. Time to clear the table.

Speaker 1:

We both clapped and said the same thing.

Speaker 2:

Oh, we did.

Speaker 1:

All right, well, thank you. Thank you all for accommodating our slightly shifted schedule Next week. You're gonna be out of town.

Speaker 2:

Oh crap.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I forgot.

Speaker 2:

Oh crap, I forgot. Oh yeah, right, oh, we're here.

Speaker 1:

Next, next week.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, yeah, two weeks from now, yeah, Next week you're here, two weeks you're out of town. I should totally. I'll go out of Vegas. Oh, we could do a remote. Yeah, Like we should check in. We should do like a split screen. That'd be cool.

Speaker 1:

I'm not going out of town, so I'll just be hanging out over here.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, oh my God, that'd be so cool.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, but if you wanna keep an eye on that, we do have an email list. That's just for couple of tables stuff where we send out like notifications of the shows and everything.

Speaker 2:

So if we have to move stuff around, you'll get the link, yeah.

Speaker 1:

It's not used for anything else, other communication. It's just usually the day before a show. We just say like hey, tomorrow, like last night it was like hey, new time 11 AM here's a link.

Speaker 2:

Link in the description. Oops, I hit this.

Speaker 1:

Alrighty.

Speaker 2:

Well.

Speaker 1:

Oh hey, Patrick, Patrick, hey, thank you for hanging out. Oh wait, sorry. This answers the last question. Rocky says I've tried Cap Cut because of the subtitling tool, but I find it too complicated for what I was doing. My shorts are just shots of the comic with my VO Plus background music.

Speaker 2:

Nice, good to know All about finding the tool that works for you yeah.

Speaker 1:

So I hope you have a safe, happy, healthy fun the rest of your week and a great weekend, and we'll see you next time.

Speaker 2:

Bye, hello, can you? You never have to be sorry for participating in the comments. We thank you. Yeah, this is what it's for, so thank you. I have to be a friend, I appreciate it. Thank you Bye.

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